Focus and grammatical relations in creole languages
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Focus and grammatical relations in creole languages

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Published by J. Benjamins in Amsterdam, Philadelphia .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Creole dialects -- Grammar.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references and indexes.

Statementedited by Francis Byrne, Donald Winford.
SeriesCreole language library,, v. 12
ContributionsByrne, Francis., Winford, Donald.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsPM7831 .F63 1993
The Physical Object
Paginationxvi, 329 p. ;
Number of Pages329
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL1403630M
ISBN 101556191669
LC Control Number93011700

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This linguistic study looks at focus and grammatical relations in Creole languages. Topics covered include: verb focus, predicate clefting and predicate doubling; focus and anti-focus; focus and pronominals; discourse patterning; and grammatical relations. Focus and grammatical relations in creole languages. Edited by Francis Byrne and Donald Winford Author(s): Focus and grammatical relations in creole languages. Edited by Francis Byrne and Donald Winford, Page 1 of 1 Book Review Most Cited This Month Creoles are typologically distinct from non-creoles Author: John M. Lipski. Papers from the University of Chicago Conference on Focus and Grammatical Relations in Creole Languages Edited by Francis Byrne and Donald Winford [ Creole Language Library 12] Grammatical Relations in a Radical Creole: Verb Complementation in Saramaccan (Creole Language Library) [Byrne, Francis, Bickerton, Derek] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Grammatical Relations in a Radical Creole: Verb Complementation in Saramaccan (Creole Language Cited by:

Byrne, Francis and Donald Winford, eds. Focus and Grammatical Relations in Creole Languages. Amsterdam: John Benjamins, Carrington, Lawrence D. St. Lucian Creole – A Descriptive Analysis of Its Phonology and Morpho-Syntax. Amsterdam: John Benjamins, File Size: KB. AScope of negation and focus in [email protected] In Focus and grammatical relations in creole languages, ed. by Francis Byrne and Donald Winford, Amsterdam: John Benjamins. a. AOn decreolization: The case of [email protected] In Language and the social construction of identity in creole situations, ed. by Marcyliena Morgan, Los Angeles File Size: KB. 3. Creoles as a Type. The German philologist Hugo Schuchardt (, ) was the first to note the challenge of fitting creole languages in the genealogical tree that philologists had designed and which divided Indo-European languages into distinct language the very start, it has been clear to creolists and historical linguists alike that creoles do not constitute a family of Cited by: 1. This book is a delight as it takes us up close and personal to the theater of creole formation, from Africa to the Americas original and insightful This book is a refreshing contribution to creole studies and beyond, with many enriching insights for linguistic theory and for theories of language contact and language change writ large Cited by: 9.

  Unfortunately, there are few sources out there for learning Kreyol (Haitian Creole). This little book is one of the best options available, and that is the sad thing. At pages, this source is jammed-packed with sixteen logically-arranged lessons, some reading exercises, and an English-Kreyol dictionary at the end/5(86). Focus and Grammatical Relations in Creole Languages: Papers from the University of Chicago Conference on Focus and Grammatical Relations in Creole LAN by Francis Byrne (Editor), /5(27). APiCS (The atlas of pidgin and creole language structures) has gathered comparable synchronic data on the grammatical and lexical structures of a large number of pidgin and creole languages. It has been published in four volumes (September ): Michaelis, Susanne Maria, Maurer, Philippe, Haspelmath, Martin & Huber, Magnus (eds.). Most commonly, creoles have resulted from the interactions between speakers of nonstandard varieties of European languages and speakers of non-European languages. Creole languages include varieties that are based on French, such as Haitian Creole, Louisiana Creole, and Mauritian Creole.